Brioche Monte Cristo with Sriracha Hollandaise Sauce (dried eggs)

Fortification/Protein Enrichment

Among other nutritional benefits, some formulations concentrate on protein fortification or enrichment of foods that may or may not already contain protein. Consumers in the past few years indicate they are interested in increasing protein intake with the majority selecting eggs as their preferred option for protein fortification.1

One large egg contains a wide variety of nutrients for a relatively low calorie count, with just 70 calories containing 6 grams of high-quality protein. For this reason, eggs and egg products are considered “nutrient-rich” according to the definition of the USDA ARS. Nutrient dense foods and beverages provide vitamins, minerals and other substances that may have positive health effects with relatively few calories. In addition, the definition states nutrients and other beneficial substances have not been ‘diluted’ by the addition of energy from added solid fasts, added sugars or the solid fats naturally present in the food.2

Foods formulated with egg products contain all the nutrition originally found in the egg product, including high-quality protein, trans-fatty acid free mono- and poly-unsaturated fats, vitamins, minerals and other highly bioavailable nutrients with recognized health and wellness benefits.3

Of special note is the quality of protein. Eggs contain all nine essential amino acids, with whole egg protein having a biological value of 93.7 on a 100-point scale. The essential amino acid composition of egg protein is similar to the human body’s requirement, allowing the body to use the protein more efficiently to maintain muscle tone and strength as the body ages.3

The egg’s lipid portion, which is found primarily in the yolk, contains 5 percent of the Daily Value of fat-soluble vitamin D, a nutrient associated with bone health. It is a source of lutein and zeaxanthin, two nutrients classified as xanthophyll carotenoids and have been shown to contribute to eye health. While eggs contain only a small amount of these nutrients, research suggests that the lutein and zeaxanthin from eggs may be more bioavailable, or more easily absorbed by the body, than from richer sources. The lipid portion is also a concentrated source of choline, a nutrient necessary for the normal functioning of all cells in all people, with some segments of the population requiring more choline during certain life stages, such as pregnancy.4

1. Food Business News, “Protein-packed items may need specific messaging,” May 6, 2016, Jeff Gelski http://www.foodbusinessnews.net/articles/news_home/Consumer_Trends/2016/05/Protein-packed_items_may_need.aspx?ID=%7BED197903-CF17-4809-A9F7-D70C7263B5D6%7D (Accessed May 16, 2016)

2. Nicklas T.A., Drewnowski A., O’Neil C.E. 2014. The nutrient density approach to healthy eating: challenges and opportunities. Public Health Nutrition 17(12):2626-2636.

3. https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Choline-HealthProfessional/

4. National Institute of Health, Choline, Fact Sheet for Health Professionals https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Choline-HealthProfessional/

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