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Consumers are looking for healthy alternatives

Energy boosting foods are in demand. Eggs, nature's answer to the quest for a near-perfect protein, are also your answer to the quest for a highly available, highly functional protein ingredient. Just look at the facts:

  • Eggs contain the most easily digestible, most readily available protein compared to any other type.
  • Eggs are used as the standard for measuring the protein quality of other ingredients.
  • Up to 97% of egg protein is in the form of readily available, essential amino acids. • Processed eggs contribute the same high-quality protein as fresh.

In addition to high protein formulations, we have plenty of formulas that are easily adaptable for your product formulations organized by type, including appetizers, sauces, main dishes, desserts, and gluten-free applications. You’ll find information about how egg products, with their many functional properties, are a simpler, more natural choice than using a host of specific chemical additives.

2010-06-14 22:51:45
 

Egg Safety

The first step toward ensuring a safe processed food is to ensure the basic ingredients are safe as well. The egg product safety record allows food processors to rest in the knowledge that they are using a safe ingredient when including further processed, pasteurized eggs. Egg nutritional and functional power is supplied by nature while its safety record is provided by the producers’ hard work and conscientious effort to implement best practices.

Actually, government and private industry work together to achieve this safety record. Congress passed the Egg Products Inspection Act in 1970 which requires that all egg products distributed for consumption be pasteurized to destroy Salmonella. In the past 40 years, there have been no recorded outbreaks of salmonellosis linked to pasteurized egg products, since the institution of mandatory pasteurization.

This safety record is especially impressive considering the volume of eggs consumed in this country. Of the more than 76 billion eggs eaten annually, slightly more than 30% are in the form of egg products, further processed into either a liquid, frozen or dried form.

The first step in producing an egg product is removal from the shell followed by filtering and cooling to maintain quality while waiting processing. Further processing may include the addition of non-egg ingredients, mixing or blending, stabilizing, pasteurizing, cooling, and packaging for freezing or subsequent to drying.

FDA regulations require qualifying statements when the terms “no hormones or antibiotics” are declared on labels for eggs. In addition, the terminology no hormones or therapeutic antibiotics are used in the production of eggs for human food. Antibiotics may be used occasionally, but eggs from treated hens are removed from the market for a specified period of time in accordance with applicable regulations.

Creating appealing food products with great taste is a challenge enough. Exceed your expectations and take the worry about safety out of your formulation concerns with real egg products. For more information about the wide variety of pasteurized, government inspected, further processed egg products, contact American Egg Board, 1-800-488-6143 or 847-296-7043, or visit www.aeb.org.

2010-06-08 14:26:20
 

Stabilization from Nature

The proteins in eggs also function as stabilizers in various food systems as a result of their ability to coagulate. “When heated or exposed to acid, egg proteins change from a liquid to a semi-solid or solid state,” says Elisa Maloberti, director of egg product marketing, American Egg Board, Park Ridge, IL. “This transformation assists with the binding of ingredients, including water, in complex food systems, preventing products from crumbling, losing shape or simply falling apart.


Eggs are an ideal all-natural stabilizer for ice cream, as exemplified by the recently introduced  Häagen-Dazs Five line, which focuses on the simplicity of five ingredients: milk, cream, sugar, eggs and one characterizing flavoring.

Choosing the right stabilizer for a food system depends on many factors, including processing, desired textural attributes and shelf-life requirements. Often, a blend of natural stabilizers will do the job,  eliminating the need to explore man-made stabilizers that prevent a product from competing in the growing natural products category.

 For more information, click here.

2010-06-01 21:05:49
 

Multifunctional Eggs for Baked Goods

Few ingredients, bring as many functional attributes to the table as eggs. And when it comes to baked goods, eggs are regularly part of the formulation package.

 Egg replacers have seen more use in baked goods of late. Although formulators sometimes resort to using replacers when egg prices rise, Craig “Skip” Julius, an ambassador to the egg industry, notes that such kneejerk reactions are short-sighted: “People get so focused on preserving the margin ‘right now.’ They overlook the fact that all food commodities eventually revert to the mean.” Reformulation also costs an enormous amount of money, he says—and quality is a factor. “Every time one makes a formula change, a little something gets lost, compromises are made,” he says.

Eggs also fit into the category of “natural foods,” a clean-label movement that’s picking up steam. “There is a huge move to natural ingredient labels,” says Julius.

 To read more, visit Multifunctional Eggs for Baked Goods

2010-05-25 11:54:58
 

Egg Products Buyers’ Guide

Are you sure that you’re using the right egg product in your product formulations? Why not step back and compare your egg ingredient selection with the wide range of choices that exist today. Overall, the egg category has grown substantially and supply companies have responded with a remarkable array of new and better ways to store and use eggs. American Egg Board’s Egg Product Buyers’ Guide is a complete list of US egg product suppliers cross-referenced by product type.

For the up-to-date Buyers’ Guide, click here.

 

2010-05-18 17:05:16
 

Eggs Can Do That, Too!

Few food ingredients are as “pure & simple” as egg products, which “are recognized by product developers as bringing more to product formulations with less,” according to Elisa Maloberti, director of egg product marketing, American Egg Board, Park Ridge, IL “In fact, with 20-plus functions, some might say egg products are anything but simple. But the truth is, egg products are uniquely pure and simple.”

 According to Datamonitor, New York, labeling terms such as “natural” and “organic” are no longer as powerful as they once were as a result of their prevalence in the industry. The new approach to convey “better for you” is to take a machete to ingredient lists, replacing those that sound more at home in a chemistry lab with simple ingredients that consumers recognize…real foods such as egg products.

 Learn more at: Eggs Can Do That, Too!

2010-05-11 19:55:53
 

Egg Products Buyers’ Guide



Are you sure that you’re using the right egg product in your product formulations? Why not step back and compare your egg ingredient selection with the wide range of choices that exist today. Overall, the egg category has grown substantially and supply companies have responded with a remarkable array of new and better ways to store and use eggs. American Egg Board’s Egg Product Buyers’ Guide is a complete list of US egg product suppliers cross-referenced by product type, region, and company.

For the up-to-date Buyers’ Guide, click here.

2010-05-04 18:30:44
 

Sodium Reduction: Mining the Possibilities

Egg products are naturally low in sodium and possess multifunctional components for foaming, binding and emulsifying, and other functions.  Clean labels are dependent upon the ingredients. Egg products offer a clean label option and can help maintain product integrity and stability in a reduced sodium formulation. Egg products are capable of binding other ingredients, providing structure and stability and assisting with moisture migration while not conflicting with flavors of other ingredients. In fact, eggs have functional properties that do the job of many additives, yet naturally. Today's consumers, better educated and more label savvy, are avoiding additives and seeking more natural food alternatives.

Custom blended egg products that include carbohydrates, gum, starches, sugar, and low levels of salt are available to meet manufacturers' specifications and improve functional performance.  Egg products make so many food formulations great or better. The functional profile egg products provide is worth investigating to mine the possibilities for all the value they can provide to sodium reduced and other formulations.

See our white paper at Sodium Reduction: Mining the Possibilities

2010-04-20 11:14:59
 

Accept No Substitutes

 Eggs possess unique nutritional properties and contribute desirable functional attributes unequaled by any single egg alternative. New research supports a hypothesis that eggs require more than a simple 1:1 substitution with an egg alternative to acquire similar ingredient functionality in many prepared foods.

 Eggs also contribute a clean, natural image to help create a consumer-friendly ingredient statement for packaged or prepared foods.

 Egg products are available liquid, frozen or dried for the convenience of the food formulator. Regardless of form, the egg's nutritional and functional qualities remain intact. When properly stored, egg products will maintain a stable shelf life for months.

 Stop by and learn more at Accept No Substitutes

2010-04-12 22:28:50
 

The Power of Protein

 

Fat and carbohydrate regularly made headlines during the past decade for everything  from double bond configuration to digestibility. Protein, on the other hand, was seldom in the spotlight, as the previous consensus has been that Americans consume plenty essential amino acids — the building blocks of protein. Protein’s time has come, and consumers are taking note of the many powers of protein and how they vary by source.

 According to the recently released 2009 Food & Health Survey: Consumer Attitudes  toward Food, Nutrition, & Health, conducted by the International Food Information Council (IFIC) Foundation, Washington, D.C., very few consumers believe protein is to blame for weight gain. When asked about the relationship between the source of calories and weight gain, 30% of Americans correctly identify that “calories, in general, are most likely to cause weight gain.”

 In an IFIC survey, consumers were asked on an aided basis whether they are aware of certain food components and their associated health benefits. Eighty-three percent were aware of a relationship between protein and maintaining optimal  health, while an impressive 80% knew that protein consumption was related to weight management and that protein provides a feeling of fullness.

 Prepared foods can be formulated with satisfying egg products. Egg products come in a variety of forms and complement all types of food applications. Eggs products include whole eggs, whites, yolks and various blends with or without non-egg ingredients included to provide greater functionality. These further-processed eggs come in liquid, frozen and dried forms for convenience, ease in handling and storage.

"While many Americans may be getting enough protein, they need to focus on consuming sources of higher-quality protein,” says Donald Layman, Ph.D., co-author of the research review and director of nutrition research, Egg Nutrition Center, Park Ridge, Illinois. “Our review of the science suggests that eggs [and egg products] are an ideal protein choice.”

Learn more at: eggcellent Foods, eggcellent Protein

 

2010-04-06 22:57:06