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Snacking, convenience led food introductions in 2016

We’re a nation of snackers, or at least, that’s the label that fits according to the Mintel Global New Products Database. A look back at 2016 new product introductions reveals the snacks category witnessed the highest number of new product introductions in the U.S. at 3,172.

Eggs and egg ingredients appeared in a variety of snack foods, but by far the biggest category for egg inclusion was the bakery.  In fact, after egg ingredient inclusion in baked goods dipped somewhat in 2015 (629 new products) compared to 2014 (705 new products), eggs apparently regained their popularity in 2016, appearing in the highest number of new products for any given year, at 775 new product introductions.  

The top ten categories for egg ingredients in 2016:

  • Bakery
  • Meals & Meal Centers
  • Desserts & Ice Cream
  • Pet Food
  • Side Dishes
  • Snacks
  • Sauces & Seasonings
  • Processed Fish, Meat & Egg Products
  • Chocolate Confectionery
  • Soup

Kosher, Convenient and Clean

A look at the product claims that might play a role in food formulators’ selection of egg ingredients include Kosher, convenience and clean.

“Microwaveable” claims on products were on the rise, as a convenient cooking method that saves time. This fits within one of the Mintel identified megatrends for 2017, “Time is of the Essence.” The Mintel piece says consumers are seeking “short-cut solutions that are still fresh, nutritious and customizable.” In a microwave product, the inclusion of one large egg in a breakfast bowl for example, supplies six grams of high-quality protein for a fast, nutritious and satisfying meal or snack. Egg ingredients can help foster short-cut solutions that Mintel claims will “become a clear selling point” for food and drink products that save time.

As far as clean, another popular claim on foods including egg ingredients is “no additives/preservatives.” This product claim rises year over year, as does “gluten free,” a lifestyle or eating habit being adopted by an increasing number of American consumers. Clean labeling of healthy foods fits within another Mintel megatrend for 2017, “Balancing the Scales: Health for Everyone.” Especially important, the analyst states are campaigns and innovations the make it easier for lower-income consumers to fulfill their healthy ambitions.

We anticipate 2017 will see an even greater number of products that rely on egg ingredients for not only their functional properties, but also due to protein content and clean label implications. The egg supply is abundant. Our online Buyers’ Guide can help you find the right supplier. Click on www.AEB.org/BuyersGuide.    

http://www.mintel.com/press-centre/food-and-drink/mintel-announces-six-key-global-food-and-drink-trends-for-2017

2017-03-13 18:49:33
 

An Egg a Day to Reduce Stroke Risk

An apple a day is associated with preventive measures for better health. New studies continue to build eggs’ reputation as a recommended, better-for-you food choice. A recent meta-analysis published in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition

(JACN)1 suggests daily egg intake does not appear to be associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease and may actually contribute to decreased stroke risk. Researchers examined studies that were published from 1982 to 2015 and that involved close to 300,000 participants, to draw their conclusions. They found that consuming one egg per day reduced the risk of stroke by 12 percent. Stroke is the fifth leading cause of death in the United States.2 Also, the study concluded there was no association between eating an egg and coronary heart disease.

Principal study investigator Dominik Alexander, Ph.D., Ann Arbor, MI, is quoted as saying “Eggs do have many positive nutritional attributes, including antioxidants, which have been shown to reduce oxidative stress and inflammation.” 

“They are also an excellent source of protein, which has been related to lower blood pressure,” he continued.

One large egg contains six grams of high-quality protein and antioxidants, found within the egg yolk, as well as 13 other vitamins and minerals in varying quantities, including vitamins E, D and A.3

Dr. Alexander’s research corroborates changes in the 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans4, which eliminated dietary cholesterol limits and includes eggs among lean protein choices recommended for consumption. The guidelines noted eggs are an affordable, accessible, nutrient-rich source of high-quality protein.

Egg ingredients also are affordable and accessible for food manufacturers. Eggs and egg ingredients of all types are in abundant supply.

Further, studies like the recent JACN article help confirm the role that eggs can play in a healthy diet. As consumers read and absorb new scientifically based information about the health benefits associated with eggs, this poses clean label implications.

Many baked goods for example, rely upon eggs for product form, structure, appearance, shelf life and taste. Bakerpedia, in its explanation of clean label states “Clean label products aim to market to consumers focusing on a healthy lifestyle and consuming only wholesome, nutritious food to provide energy while removing any unnatural elements of food from consumption.”5 

This focus on a healthy lifestyle is a major factor in the development of the clean label movement. Consumers seek clean labels in products across categories however, not just in the bakery. And one survey revealed that consumers value clean label above brand. Seventy-seven percent of respondents agreed that the ingredient list of food and drink products is important while only 53% felt the manufacturer or brand was very or quite important.6

As mounting scientific evidence reflects the health benefits of eggs, this means egg ingredients can lend a “healthy halo” to food products, which is good news for the consumer and manufacturer alike.

 

1Alexander DD, Miller PE, Vargas AJ, Weed DL, Cohen SS. Meta-analysis of egg consumption and risk of coronary heart disease and stroke. J Am Coll Nutr. 2016 Oct 6:1-13.

2 https://www.cdc.gov/stroke/

https://ndb.nal.usda.gov/ndb/foods/show/112?manu=&fgcd=&ds

https://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/2015/

http://www.bakerpedia.com/processes/clean-label/

http://www.sustainablebrands.com/news_and_views/packaging/
hannah_furlong/consumers_actively_seek%E2%80%99_natural_ingredients_clean_label_pac

2017-02-27 15:43:16
 

Sweeter than Ever

Indulgence—the very word conjures up a sense of satisfaction and perhaps a wee touch of guilty pleasure. Despite the trends towards healthier eating, small, simple indulgences within the food world retain their popularity.

Among the most recent predictions for 2017 by Sterling-Rice Group (SRG), their top is “Wake and Cake,” or a diet str ategy that promotes sweet indulgence in the a.m. segment. SRG expects more people to participate in this trend to indulge in cake either for or immediately after breakfast.

The group leaned on two separate studies to formulate this trend: one from Syracuse University that proves a daily dose of chocolate improves cognitive abilities, such as memory and abstract reasoning; and the second, a Tel Aviv University report that says eating dessert after breakfast could help people lose weight.

Actually, the study in Tel Aviv found that breakfast was a huge factor in weight loss success. One group consumed a low-carb diet with a 300-calorie breakfast, while the other ate a balanced 600-calorie breakfast with a chocolate cake dessert. The researcher said, “The group that consumed a bigger breakfast including dessert, experienced few if any cravings for these foods later in the day.” “These” refers to carbs and sugars. The cravings for carbs and sugars caused participants in group one to cheat on their diet plan.

Where can you find an ingredient that helps create a balanced breakfast and can help create a tasty chocolate cake?  Look no farther than the egg. One large egg contains six grams of high-quality protein and makes an eggs-cellent addition to any balanced breakfast. And egg ingredients act as staples in cakes of multiple varieties, to aid with texture, crumb, flavor, appearance and much more. We have a series of videos that discuss the role of egg ingredients in baking where you can learn more about their functional role within chocolate cake and other applications.

Chocolate cake for breakfast—that’s a diet trend I can wholeheartedly embrace!

2017-02-13 08:45:18
 

Biosecurity and the Egg Supply

Not as catchy perhaps as “Jack and the Beanstalk,” or “Beauty and the Beast,” but the relationship between biosecurity and the egg supply is of vital importance to egg farmers and the food manufacturing industry. It’s no fairy tale either, but based on thorough investigation, sound science and hard work.

Eggs are in ample supply, mostly due to the hard work of egg farmers to recover as quickly as possible from the devastating effects of avian influenza in the spring of 2015. In fact, the industry recovered more quickly than projected by initial estimates.

Thorough investigation after AI yielded new measures recommended for egg farmers, based on sound scientific principles. Biosecurity is always a priority on U.S. egg farms and egg farmers are focused on taking all needed steps to protect their flocks. In response to the viral outbreak, U.S. egg farmers, together with turkey and chicken producers, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and other authorities, have heightened measures on the farm to limit the spread of avian influenza. Comprehensive biosecurity practices on commercial egg farms include, but are not limited to, restricting farm access, preventing hens from exposure to wild and migratory birds, increasing veterinary monitoring of flocks and using protective gear at all times.

USDA offers a comprehensive HPAI Biosecurity checklist for the sound start to a stringent biosecurity plan that includes processes to safeguard the premises and proper practices regarding equipment handling, personnel, visitors and vehicles that travel to or between individual farms.

The ample supply of eggs and egg ingredients in all forms give formulators the opportunity to stretch their creative imagination for new and proven applications. In addition, eggs fit any dining trend. The six grams of high-quality protein, contained in any single, large egg, makes them the perfect component for a protein pack or salad kit in the fresh aisle or “grocerant.” Pre-peeled hard-boiled eggs, available from some egg suppliers, make it easy to incorporate eggs into these applications.

Egg ingredients’ functional properties provide a functional powerhouse for clean label products from appetizers through dessert and any category in between.  And as a further measure to protect the public and provide peace of mind, all further processed egg ingredients are pasteurized, for food safety. 

The egg and egg ingredients—their functional properties and nutritional value make them a fairy tale come true for formulators when the facts bear out the promotion.

 

2017-01-30 09:47:00
 

Healthy snacks: Protein UP and processing down

Like opposite ends of a see-saw, as consumer pressure mounts for increasingly healthier snacks and greater amounts of protein, just as equally they’re demanding foods that are minimally processed with few to no additives, when possible.

Luckily, clean-label applications within the protein-centric category are within reach when clean label ingredients like eggs are available.

According to one presentation at the Global Food Forums Protein Trends Seminar in 2016, strong growth defines protein-centric categories. Sports nutrition bars and powder, protein supplements, energy bars and meal replacements lead the charge.

Active, healthy lifestyle consumers are choosing healthier foods and exercising more. Boomers recognize the value of protein for aging muscles. Millennials crave convenience and better nutrition in foods and beverages designed for on-the-go consumption, whereas parents want healthier snack options for their children.

Add to this the fact that more consumers report flexitarian eating patterns, with 44% of consumers serving a meatless meal at least 1-3x per week, and it makes a protein-focused formulating strategy a wise move.

Eggs have traditionally been used as the standard of comparison for measuring protein quality because of their essential amino acid (EAA) profile and high digestibility. Whether using a hard-boiled egg in a protein pack or using one of the different types of egg ingredients available for formulators in frozen, liquid or dried form, often these ingredients can appear simply as “eggs” on the label.

Admittedly, there are new protein ingredients available for formulators to try. There is now a distinction between new or so-called “legacy” ingredients, such as eggs. There are multiple reasons why legacy ingredients like the egg are well trusted within the industry. One primary reason is reliability. Egg ingredients have proven their functional value through decades of use in applications of all varieties.

Many baked goods owe their appearance, texture, taste and part of their shelf life to egg ingredients. Proteins from egg whites help control crystallization in select confections and frozen foods. The flexibility egg ingredients offer formulators fit a variety of applications in many different categories, including vegetarian and flexitarian formulationsEgg ingredients, through their various functional properties, a list comprised of more than 20, contribute to all of those properties, depending on the application. No need for seesawing concerns when using egg ingredients; they offer the perfect balance of proteinfunctionality and clean label benefits.

 

2017-01-16 08:05:00
 

Taking advantage of the store perimeter

Just as an eggshell protects the interior part of the egg, the perimeter of the store is safeguarding the fiscal health of today’s grocery store. According to Information Resources, Inc. (IRI), the perimeter is actually the “epicenter” for growth.

In 2015 the fresh prepared category demonstrated 9.8% growth to reach $10.8 billion in sales. U.S. supermarket foodservice sales are larger than that of prominent chains such as Domino’s or Dunkin Donuts, and growing at a faster pace than Wendy’s, Starbucks or Panera.

The outlook for the next three to five years shows perimeter growth is going to continue, with accelerated sales growth for certain high performing product categories. Food product developers who embrace this trend can realize success with existing or new product introductions.

While entrees and appetizers dominate, salads are not far behind. Salad sales equaled $1.5 billion exhibiting 9.0 percent growth. Dips and sauces in the fresh section don’t represent the largest category, but sales grew an astounding 34.9 percent in 2015.

Whether looking to create entrees, appetizers, salads, dips and sauces or a grab-and-go single-serve dessert, eggs and egg ingredients play important roles to help create enticing foods for the fresh market concept.

Egg ingredients contribute more than twenty functional properties including binding, emulsification, whipping and aeration to name a few, that help breading’s adhere to appetizers, cakes form and dips and sauces retain a smooth, creamy consistency.

Eggs complement salads, adding a recognizable protein component that helps attract consumer interest. Try creating your own refrigerated grab-and-go protein pack that contains a hard-boiled egg alongside cheese or sliced vegetables.

Egg ingredients of all varieties are currently available in abundant supply. Pre-peeled, hard-boiled eggs, the perfect component for salads or protein packs, are available from some egg suppliers. We have a complete listing in our newly updated Egg Product Buyer’s Guide. Take advantage of eggs to realize the full potential of store perimeter sales!

Just as an eggshell protects the interior part of the egg, the perimeter of the store is safeguarding the fiscal health of today’s grocery store. According to Information Resources, Inc. (IRI), the perimeter is actually the “epicenter” for growth.

In 2015 the fresh prepared category demonstrated 9.8% growth to reach $10.8 billion in sales. U.S. supermarket foodservice sales are larger than that of prominent chains such as Domino’s or Dunkin Donuts, and growing at a faster pace than Wendy’s, Starbucks or Panera.

The outlook for the next three to five years shows perimeter growth is going to continue, with accelerated sales growth for certain high performing product categories. Food product developers who embrace this trend can realize success with existing or new product introductions.

While entrees and appetizers dominate, salads are not far behind. Salad sales equaled $1.5 billion exhibiting 9.0 percent growth. Dips and sauces in the fresh section don’t represent the largest category, but sales grew an astounding 34.9 percent in 2015.

Whether looking to create entrees, appetizers, salads, dips and sauces or a grab-and-go single-serve dessert, eggs and egg ingredients play important roles to help create enticing foods for the fresh market concept.

Egg ingredients contribute more than twenty functional properties including binding, emulsification, whipping and aeration to name a few, that help breading’s adhere to appetizers, cakes form and dips and sauces retain a smooth, creamy consistency.

Eggs complement salads, adding a recognizable protein component that helps attract consumer interest. Try creating your own refrigerated grab-and-go protein pack that contains a hard-boiled egg alongside cheese or sliced vegetables.

Egg ingredients of all varieties are currently available in abundant supply. Pre-peeled, hard-boiled eggs, the perfect component for salads or protein packs, are available from some egg suppliers. We have a complete listing in our newly updated Egg Product Buyer’s Guide. Take advantage of eggs to realize the full potential of store perimeter sales!

2017-01-03 16:37:08
 

Protein snacks packs: A hard-boiled story

Savory characters can have their ‘sweet’ spots and hard-boiled eggs are no exception. The growing popularity of protein snack packs led to a new consumer survey conducted by Datassential, revealing that hard-boiled eggs could play the hero in snack pack concepts that attract consumer interest and spark purchase intent. Researchers tested product concepts to determine the type of hard-boiled egg pairings and packaging that were most appealing. The research also zeroed in on key characteristics of protein snack purchasers and identified purchasing triggers.

Frequency … Nearly 80 percent of protein pack buyers purchase them at least monthly. Furthermore, 41 percent overall purchase these types of protein boxes at least weekly, with that share varying widely by brand.

Dayparts Purchase intent is not tied to a specific daypart. Most consumers in fact, say they purchase a protein pack as a snack (64 percent), while 59 percent said purchase intent is tied to the lunch/dinner segment and 52 percent say they purchase protein packs for breakfast.

Descriptors Half of all consumers believe that the word “pack” best describes a protein snack option, with approximately one-third or 29 percent favoring the word “kit,” while “box” came in third.

Survey respondents said they would be most interested in and likely to buy hard-boiled eggs as snacks if they came in portable packaging, with the addition of flavor and more prominent nutritional benefit communication on package labels. Also, consumers seem to prefer their proteins paired together, citing preferences in combo packs for hard-boiled eggs to be paired with meat, cheese, nuts or fruit.

Savory’s Sweet Spot

The company tested a few hard-boiled egg snack pack concepts, including packaging and label designs, with the consumer groups. Among prototypes tested, the two that scored the highest included a two-egg protein snack pack including seasoning, and a three-compartment “protein power” snack box that featured a hard-boiled egg, cheese and roasted edamame. These two concepts among those tested, exhibited the highest earnings potential, scoring well for factors including high purchase intent, uniqueness, frequency and draw.

This combination of high purchase intent and a high uniqueness is considered the “sweet spot” for new product concept development. If you’re interested in more specifics concerning product concept development and survey results from Datassential, send me an email. Or, to find producers that distribute precooked hard-boiled eggs and other precooked egg products to start creating protein snack pack concepts, try checking our online Egg Product Buyer’s Guide

2016-12-19 08:08:44
 

Whole eggs tell complete story in baking sector

While formulators find great value in the functional properties supplied by separated egg ingredients, such as egg whites or egg yolks, whole eggs operate with great efficiency in multiple baking applications.

The baking sector encompasses a wide variety of formats, from bread and rolls to pastries and desserts. Euromonitor estimated the total 2015 international baked goods market at $339 billion in sales.

Historically, baked goods rely on a few simple ingredients. Depending on the finished product the list often includes flour, sugar, eggs, butter or shortening, milk or water, leaveners and flavoring. From that list, whole eggs can contribute multiple functional and organoleptic properties to the vast majority of baked goods such as cakes.

Liquid whole eggs are approximately 74 percent moisture and contribute moisture to cake batter. In addition, while flour helps build cake structure, eggs are almost equally as important to a cake’s structure. The proteins within eggs when physically mixed and heated unfold or denature. The proteins then form a cross-linked network to hold in gases, creating a relatively stable foam of tiny air bubbles, which help create the crumb structure in the baked cake. Carotenoids in the yolk contribute to the golden brown crust or exterior and for a yellow cake, the color of the cake interior. In addition, eggs act as an emulsifier in the complex oil-in-water emulsion phase of cake mixing, supporting cake texture and eating quality.

Whole eggs aid with flavor development in cakes, without lending any strong or off-putting flavors themselves. Whole eggs, especially the fat in the yolk, act as an effective flavor carrier to allow fat-soluble flavoring ingredients, such as vanilla extract, more prominence. Whole eggs also help interfere with starch retro gradation to prevent or delay staling. And the natural lipids in egg yolks and whole eggs help create a moist, supple eating quality.

For whole eggs in baked goods, obviously one or more functional benefits carry greater prominence depending on the format of the baked good. For example, in cheesecake, with flour completely or primarily absent, that style of confection relies principally upon eggs for its structure, with the coagulative properties supporting the rich, dense cheese filling.

We have a library of videos that can supply more information about egg functionality within baking and other types of applications. Simply visit www.AEB.org/TechTalk Videos. 

2016-12-05 15:27:37
 

Eggs make the grade under new smart snacks ruling

Like many other parents, I’ve spent hours planning and packing healthy lunches and snacks for my children to take with them to school. Apples, oranges and grapes featured frequently, as did hard-boiled eggs, packed alongside some pepper or mustard for flavoring. Now eggs can make their way to the classroom on their own.  

Final guidelines issued recently by the USDA Food and Nutrition Service under its Smart Snacks Rule qualifies eggs, specifically hard-boiled eggs, as an option for healthy snacks and a la carte offerings in schools. In a change from earlier renditions of the rule, this final rule exempts whole eggs from limits on both total fat and saturated fat.

Drawing on recommendations from the Institute of Medicine and existing voluntary standards already implemented by thousands of schools around the country, this rule carefully balances science-based nutrition guidelines with practical and flexible solutions to promote healthier eating in schools.  In fact, the final rule’s preamble specifically cites the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans that identifies eggs as “nutrient dense” and includes eggs in its recommended healthy eating patterns. Schools can include hard-cooked or hard-boiled eggs as snacks or menu items, as long as no fat has been added to them.

One large egg contains varying amounts of 13 essential vitamins and minerals plus six grams of protein for just 70 calories, leading to its designation as a nutrient dense food. 

Starting with school year 2014-2015, the Smart Snacks ruling mandated the types of food sold at schools, during the school day, meet certain nutrition standards. This Smart Snacks in School regulation applies to foods sold a la carte, in the school store and in vending machines. The ruling is designed to encourage children to make healthier snack choices that give them the nutrition they need to grow and learn, and conforms to the provisions of the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010.

Protein packs and snacks featuring protein have garnered plenty of interest in the consumer sector, stating new entrants are “flooding” into the high-protein market. The packs illustrate creativity and variety that protein packs can display and hard-boiled eggs also present a canvas ready for creative embellishment. There are literally dozens of options for low-calorie and low-fat condiments that can help flavor hard-boiled eggs and we’ve created a few as thought starters. Overall, including hard-boiled eggs in this new ruling allows schools to use a nutrient dense food with plenty of creative options that can both please and nourish students.

To find a supplier of precooked hard-boiled eggs, visit American Egg Board’s newly revised Egg Product Buyers’ Guide.

2016-11-21 15:11:13
 

Moving from subtraction to addition—food manufacturers switch gears

The clean label movement often forced manufacturers to play the elimination game—which ingredients can we subtract from formulations to make the label simpler, shorter and more attractive to consumers? However, a new focus on “best foods for…” shifts the discussion from subtraction to addition. Which ingredients or foods are consumers seeking to add to their eating regimen in the hopes of reaping health benefits?

A Food Trends Report issued by Google this year analyzed search data and pinpointed five major trends that impact American eating habits. One of the major trends identified in the report relates to the rise of functional foods. The search analysis found that consumers are looking for foods linked to certain physiological benefits. According to the report, searches for the term “best foods for” has grown ten times since 2005, accompanied by words such as “skin,” “energy,” “your brain,” “gym workout” and the like.

These searches and the correlated interest in functional foods focuses a spotlight on ingredients—which, when added to a label, will create a positive impression and capture consumer attention.

More consumers are clamoring for protein, according to views expressed in the annual International Food Information Council Food and Health Survey. A majority or 64 percent of Americans reported they were trying to consume more protein, up from 54 percent last year. This protein focus underlines the potential of applications that include protein-based ingredients such as eggs.

One large egg contains six grams of easily digestible, high-quality protein for just 70 calories. Multiple studies link protein to satiety that aids in weight loss or recommend protein for recovery after a gym workout. In addition to protein, an egg plays host to a wealth of other vitamins and minerals.

Egg ingredients already find their way into multiple formulations and product categories for their functional properties. Precooked eggs however can play a role as a protein inclusion in snack packs, prepacked salad kits or handheld sandwiches.

The best bet for manufacturers is to not only leverage these consumer studies but also communicate product benefits openly to the buying public. Just be sure when communicating that product information fits all viewing formats—Google also reports that more than 50 percent of searches are conducted on a mobile device

2016-11-07 08:46:53